Greater Britain

Greater Britain
Электронная книга Автор книги:     Оценка: 0.0     Голосов: 0     Отзывов: 0 0 руб.     (0$) Читать книгу Скачать бесплатно Купить бумажную версию Жанр: Книги о Путешествиях Правообладатель: Public Domain Дата добавления в каталог КнигаЛит: Скачать фрагмент в формате   fb2   fb2.zip Возрастное ограничение: 0+ Оглавление Фрагмент

Оглавление

Charles Wentworth Dilke. Greater Britain

PREFACE

PART I. AMERICA

CHAPTER I. VIRGINIA

CHAPTER II. THE NEGRO

CHAPTER III. THE SOUTH

CHAPTER IV. THE EMPIRE STATE

CHAPTER V. CAMBRIDGE COMMENCEMENT

CHAPTER VI. CANADA

CHAPTER VII. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

CHAPTER VIII. THE PACIFIC RAILROAD

CHAPTER IX. OMPHALISM

CHAPTER X. LETTER FROM DENVER

CHAPTER XI. RED INDIA

CHAPTER XII. COLORADO

CHAPTER XIII. ROCKY MOUNTAINS

CHAPTER XIV. BRIGHAM YOUNG

CHAPTER XV. MORMONDOM

CHAPTER XVI. WESTERN EDITORS

CHAPTER XVII. UTAH

CHAPTER XVIII. NAMELESS ALPS

CHAPTER XIX. VIRGINIA CITY

CHAPTER XX. EL DORADO

CHAPTER XXI. LYNCH LAW

CHAPTER XXII. GOLDEN CITY

CHAPTER XXIII. LITTLE CHINA

CHAPTER XXIV. CALIFORNIA

CHAPTER XXV. MEXICO

CHAPTER XXVI. REPUBLICAN OR DEMOCRAT

CHAPTER XXVII. BROTHERS

CHAPTER XXVIII. AMERICA

PART II. POLYNESIA

CHAPTER I. PITCAIRN ISLAND

CHAPTER II. HOKITIKA

CHAPTER III. POLYNESIANS

CHAPTER IV. PAREWANUI PAH

CHAPTER V. THE MAORIES

CHAPTER VI. THE TWO FLIES

CHAPTER VII. THE PACIFIC

APPENDIX. A MAORI DINNER

PART III. AUSTRALIA

CHAPTER I. SYDNEY

CHAPTER II. RIVAL COLONIES

CHAPTER III. VICTORIA

CHAPTER IV. SQUATTER ARISTOCRACY

CHAPTER V. COLONIAL DEMOCRACY

CHAPTER VI. PROTECTION

CHAPTER VII. LABOR

CHAPTER VIII. WOMAN

CHAPTER IX. VICTORIAN PORTS

CHAPTER X. TASMANIA

CHAPTER XI. CONFEDERATION

CHAPTER XII. ADELAIDE

CHAPTER XIII. TRANSPORTATION

CHAPTER XIV. AUSTRALIA

CHAPTER XV. COLONIES

PART IV. INDIA

CHAPTER I. MARITIME CEYLON

CHAPTER II. KANDY

CHAPTER III. MADRAS TO CALCUTTA

CHAPTER IV. BENARES

CHAPTER V. CASTE

CHAPTER VI. MOHAMMEDAN CITIES

CHAPTER VII. SIMLA

CHAPTER VIII. COLONIZATION

CHAPTER IX

CHAPTER X. UMRITSUR

CHAPTER XI. LAHORE

CHAPTER XII. OUR INDIAN ARMY

CHAPTER XIII. RUSSIA

CHAPTER XIV. NATIVE STATES

CHAPTER XV. SCINDE

CHAPTER XVI. OVERLAND ROUTES

CHAPTER XVII. BOMBAY

CHAPTER XVIII. THE MOHURRUM

CHAPTER XIX. ENGLISH LEARNING

CHAPTER XX. INDIA

CHAPTER XXI. DEPENDENCIES

CHAPTER XXII. FRANCE IN THE EAST

CHAPTER XXIII. THE ENGLISH

Отрывок из книги

FROM the bows of the steamer Saratoga, on the 20th June, 1866, I caught sight of the low works of Fort Monroe, as, threading her way between the sand-banks of Capes Charles and Henry, the ship pressed on, under sail and steam, to enter Chesapeake Bay.

Our sudden arrival amid shoals of sharks and kingfish, the keeping watch for flocks of canvas-back ducks, gave us enough and to spare of idle work till we fully sighted the Yorktown peninsula, overgrown with ancient memories – ancient for America. Three towns of lost grandeur, or their ruins, stand there still. Williamsburg, the former capital, graced even to our time by the palaces where once the royal governors held more than regal state; Yorktown, where Cornwallis surrendered to the continental troops; Jamestown, the earliest settlement, founded in 1607, thirteen years before old Governor Winthrop fixed the site of Plymouth, Massachusetts.

.....

There is not only a scarcity of roads, but of railroads. A comparison of the railway system of Illinois and Indiana with the two lines of Kentucky or the one of Western Virginia or Louisiana, is a comparison of the South with the North, of slavery with freedom. Virginia shows already the decay of age, but is blasted by slavery rather than by war.

The works defending Richmond, hardly so strong as those of Petersburg, were attacked in a novel manner in the third year of the war. A strong body of Federal cavalry on a raid, unsupported by infantry or guns, came suddenly by night upon the outer lines of Richmond on the west. Something had led them to believe that the rebels were not in force, and with the strange aimless daring that animated both parties during the rebellion, they rode straight in along the winding road, unchallenged, and came up to the inner lines. There they were met by a volley which emptied a few saddles, and they retired, without even stopping to spike the guns in the outer works. Had they known enough of the troops opposed to them to have continued to advance, they might have taken Richmond, and held it long enough to have captured the rebel president and senate, and burned the great iron-works and ships. The whole of the rebel army had gone north, and even the home guard was camped out on the Chickahominy. The troops who fired the volley were a company of the “iron-works battalion,” boys employed at the founderies, not one of whom had ever fired a rifle before this night. They confessed themselves that “one minute more, and they‘d have run;” but the volley just stopped the enemy in time.

.....

Подняться наверх