Maurice Tiernay, Soldier of Fortune

Maurice Tiernay, Soldier of Fortune
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Lever Charles James. Maurice Tiernay, Soldier of Fortune

NOTICE

CHAPTER I. ‘THE DAYS OF THE GUILLOTINE’

CHAPTER II. THE RESTAURANT ‘AU SCELERAT’

CHAPTER III. THE ‘TEMPLE’

CHAPTER IV. ‘THE NIGHT OF THE NINTH THERMIDOR’

CHAPTER V. THE CHOICE OF A LIFE

CHAPTER VI. ‘THE ARMY SIXTY YEARS SINCE’

CHAPTER VII. A PASSING ACQUAINTANCE

CHAPTER VIII. ‘TRONCHON’

CHAPTER IX. A SCRAPE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

CHAPTER X. AN ARISTOCRATIC REPUBLICAN

CHAPTER XI. ‘THE PASSAGE OF THE RHINE’

CHAPTER XII. ‘A GLANCE AT STAFF-DUTY’

CHAPTER XIII. A FAREWELL LETTER

CHAPTER XIV. A SURPRISE AND AN ESCAPE

CHAPTER XV. SCRAPS OF HISTORY

CHAPTER XVI. AN OLD GENERAL OF THE IRISH BRIGADE

CHAPTER XVII. LA ROCHELLE

CHAPTER XVIII. ‘THE BAY OF BATHFRAN’

CHAPTER XIX. A RECONNAISSANCE

CHAPTER XX. KILLALA

CHAPTER XXI. OUR ALLIES

CHAPTER XXII. THE DAY OF ‘CASTLEBAR’

CHAPTER XXIII. THE TOWN-MAJOR OF CASTLEBAR

CHAPTER XXIV. THE MISSION TO THE NORTH

CHAPTER XXV. A PASSING VISIT TO KILLALA

CHAPTER XXVI. A REMNANT OF ‘FONTENOY’

CHAPTER XXVII. THE CRANAGH

CHAPTER XXVIII. SOME NEW ACQUAINTANCES

CHAPTER XXIX. THE BREAKFAST AT LETTERKENNY

CHAPTER XXX. SCENE IN THE ROYAL BARRACKS

CHAPTER XXXI. A BRIEF CHANGE OF LIFE AND COUNTRY

CHAPTER XXXII. THE ‘ATHOL’ TENDER

CHAPTER XXXIII. A BOLD STROKE FOR FAME AND FORTUNE

CHAPTER XXXIV. GENOA IN THE SIEGE

CHAPTER XXXV. A NOVEL COUNCIL OP WAR

CHAPTER XXXVI. GENOA DURING THE SIEGE

CHAPTER XXXVII. MONTE DI PACCIO

CHAPTER XXXVIII. A ROYALIST ‘DE LA VIEILLE ROCHE’

CHAPTER XXXIX. A SORROWFUL PARTING

CHAPTER XL. THE CHATEAU OF ETTENHEIM

CHAPTER XLI. AN ‘ORDINARY’ ACQUAINTANCE

CHAPTER XLII. THE ‘COUNT DE MAUREPAS,’ ALIAS —

CHAPTER XLIII. A FOREST RIDE

CHAPTER XLIV. AN EPISODE OF ‘94

CHAPTER XLV. THE CABINET OF A CHEF DE POLICE

CHAPTER XLVI. A GLANCE AT THE ‘PREFECTURE DE POLICE’

CHAPTER XLVII. THE VILLAGE OP SCHWARTZ-ACH

CHAPTER XLVIII. A VILLAGE ‘SYNDICUS’

CHAPTER XLIX. A LUCKY MEETING

CHAPTER L. THE MARCH ON VIENNA

CHAPTER LI. SCHÖNBRUNN IN 1809

CHAPTER LII. KOMORN FORTY TEARS AGO

CHAPTER LIII. A LOSS AND A GAIN

CHAPTER LIV. MAURICE TIERNAY’S ‘LAST WORD AND CONFESSION’

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Neither the tastes nor the temper of the age we live in are such as to induce any man to boast of his family nobility. We see too many preparations around us for laying down new foundations, to think it a suitable occasion for alluding to the ancient edifice. I will, therefore, confine myself to saying, that I am not to be regarded as a mere pretender because my name is not chronicled by Burke or Debrett. My great-grandfather, after whom I am called, served on the personal staff of King James at the Battle of the Boyne, and was one of the few who accompanied the monarch on his flight from the field, for which act of devotion he was created a peer of Ireland, by the style and title of Timmahoo – Lord Tiernay, of Timmahoo the family called it – and a very rich-sounding and pleasant designation has it always seemed to me.

The events of the time, the scanty intervals of leisure enjoyed by the king, and other matters, prevented a due registry of my ancestors’ claims; and, in fact, when more peaceable days succeeded, it was judged prudent to say nothing about a matter which might revive unhappy recollections, and open old scores, seeing that there was now another king on the throne ‘who knew not Joseph’; and so, for this reason and many others, my greatgrandfather went back to his old appellation of Maurice Tiernay, and was only a lord among his intimate friends and cronies of the neighbourhood.

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Meanwhile the commissary and his assistants prepared to depart. Already the massive drapery of red cloth was drawn over the guillotine, and every preparation made for withdrawing, when the mob, doubtless dissatisfied that they should be defrauded of any portion of the entertainment, began to climb over the wooden barricades, and, with furious cries and shouts, threaten vengeance upon any who would screen the enemies of the people.

The troops resisted the movement, but rather with the air of men entreating calmness than with the spirit of soldiery. It was plain to see on which side the true force lay.

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